Monster of the Week #19:
Yeti
Yeti are among the most mysterious and least-understood species of giantkind. Standing an average of 14 feet tall, they inhabit remote mountain ranges, living in tightly-knit tribes among the jagged peaks and icy storms above the treeline. The harshness of their habitats combined with their relatively small population sizes make Yeti difficult subjects for study indeed, but much has been learned from what limited contact has occurred. 





While religious practice is relatively common among giantkind, Yeti are by far the most devout and spiritual. Despite their small population, the various tribes known to modern researchers display a stunning variety of beliefs and praxes that vary widely from tribe to tribe. The spiritual practice of Yeti tribes runs the gamut from polytheistic to monotheistic, in addition to a multitude of animistic beliefs. Opportunities to study the particulars of Yeti theology have been few and far between. This is due both to scarcity of contact and the immense complexity of Yeti language, which despite its relatively simple syntax is deeply couched in metaphor and religious analogy, and so varies greatly between tribes. 



Yeti are occasionally mislabeled as “Frost Giants,” and so are often confused with the semi-divine Jotunn. There is no known biological connection, although the latter do feature prominently in the cosmologies of several Yeti tribes.

Monster of the Week #19:

Yeti

Yeti are among the most mysterious and least-understood species of giantkind. Standing an average of 14 feet tall, they inhabit remote mountain ranges, living in tightly-knit tribes among the jagged peaks and icy storms above the treeline. The harshness of their habitats combined with their relatively small population sizes make Yeti difficult subjects for study indeed, but much has been learned from what limited contact has occurred. 

While religious practice is relatively common among giantkind, Yeti are by far the most devout and spiritual. Despite their small population, the various tribes known to modern researchers display a stunning variety of beliefs and praxes that vary widely from tribe to tribe. The spiritual practice of Yeti tribes runs the gamut from polytheistic to monotheistic, in addition to a multitude of animistic beliefs. Opportunities to study the particulars of Yeti theology have been few and far between. This is due both to scarcity of contact and the immense complexity of Yeti language, which despite its relatively simple syntax is deeply couched in metaphor and religious analogy, and so varies greatly between tribes. 

Yeti are occasionally mislabeled as “Frost Giants,” and so are often confused with the semi-divine Jotunn. There is no known biological connection, although the latter do feature prominently in the cosmologies of several Yeti tribes.

Monster of the Week #18:
Troll, Root Clan
Elusive and mysterious, trolls of the Root Clan are compelled by nature to seek out beginnings and places of creation. They make their homes in the roots of mountains and deep in ancient forests. Obsessed with the potential of things that grow, Root trolls will often spend their entire lives in quiet observation of their domains. Some will spend years in the caves beneath mountains, quietly listening to the shifting of the earth around them, while others will adopt small portions of forests as the self-appointed custodians of the new-growth trees and other flora. 

It is worth noting the Root troll’s preferred choices of food. Calm and peaceful creatures, they abhor the taking of life, for they see it as putting an end to unrealized potential. The only exception is perhaps the harsh, even vicious manner in which they deal with interlopers who disturb their habitats—battles between Root trolls and cave orcs, for instance, are relatively common. They subsist almost exclusively on carrion (unless it has already become a source of new life), but have a curious and inexplicable taste for mushrooms.

Monster of the Week #18:

Troll, Root Clan

Elusive and mysterious, trolls of the Root Clan are compelled by nature to seek out beginnings and places of creation. They make their homes in the roots of mountains and deep in ancient forests. Obsessed with the potential of things that grow, Root trolls will often spend their entire lives in quiet observation of their domains. Some will spend years in the caves beneath mountains, quietly listening to the shifting of the earth around them, while others will adopt small portions of forests as the self-appointed custodians of the new-growth trees and other flora.
It is worth noting the Root troll’s preferred choices of food. Calm and peaceful creatures, they abhor the taking of life, for they see it as putting an end to unrealized potential. The only exception is perhaps the harsh, even vicious manner in which they deal with interlopers who disturb their habitats—battles between Root trolls and cave orcs, for instance, are relatively common. They subsist almost exclusively on carrion (unless it has already become a source of new life), but have a curious and inexplicable taste for mushrooms.
Monster of the Week #17:
A Word on Trolls
Several words in fact, for the creatures commonly referred to as ‘Trolls’ are a complex and diverse bunch. 

All too often tales conflate these creatures with ogres and giants, when in reality they share naught but the most distant of ancestors, and then only in uncorroborated speculation. Theories abound as to the origins of trolls. Some have posited that the race was first created or “elevated” by mighty wizards in distant antiquity (a notion which most trolls contest as false and downright insulting). Others, including many trolls, believe that the first of their kind (called the “First Breath” in the language of the elusive Wind clan) were born fully formed and sentient from the base elements of their ancestral domains.

Whatever their origins, trolls of all varieties have a deep and instinctive connection to currents of natural magic. This is not to say that they are sorcerers, for trolls of that sort are relatively uncommon. Their connection to magic runs much deeper, on a level where many are even unconscious of its existence, and yet it is as essential to them as the need for food and water. Trolls thrive on a connection to certain forms of natural magic—complex metaphysical qualities found in particular locations that define the essence of a place. They are drawn inexorably to such places and often make their dwellings there, as close to the wellsprings of these magical qualities as possible. The individual “tastes” of trolls seem to vary by species or clan. For example, trolls of the Stone clan prefer places of great age and permanence, where the essence of a place has remained unchanged for hundreds or thousands of years. Trolls of the Root clan are compelled to seek out beginnings and places of creation, whereas those of the River clan seek points of change or transition, and so often make their homes beneath bridges or by the banks of rivers. 

Regarding the various varieties of trolls known to arcanozoologists, the word “clan” is the customary nomenclature, though it is widely acknowledged to be a misnomer. Most trolls are solitary creatures, and so the word “clan” would perhaps better be replaced with “species.” However, the term is derived from collective words in several of the trolls’ own languages (perhaps indicating a sense of brotherhood or unity among trolls of the same sort, or else referring to a time in ages forgotten where they did not lead such solitary lives). Therefore, by widespread and long use, it has become the generally-accepted term to refer to different species that fall under the umbrella term of “Troll.” Numerous troll clans are known to modern arcanozoologists, including Stone, Wind, Root, River, and Storm, with various legends and unconfirmed sightings hinting at the existence of many more.

Monster of the Week #17:

A Word on Trolls

Several words in fact, for the creatures commonly referred to as ‘Trolls’ are a complex and diverse bunch. 
All too often tales conflate these creatures with ogres and giants, when in reality they share naught but the most distant of ancestors, and then only in uncorroborated speculation. Theories abound as to the origins of trolls. Some have posited that the race was first created or “elevated” by mighty wizards in distant antiquity (a notion which most trolls contest as false and downright insulting). Others, including many trolls, believe that the first of their kind (called the “First Breath” in the language of the elusive Wind clan) were born fully formed and sentient from the base elements of their ancestral domains.
Whatever their origins, trolls of all varieties have a deep and instinctive connection to currents of natural magic. This is not to say that they are sorcerers, for trolls of that sort are relatively uncommon. Their connection to magic runs much deeper, on a level where many are even unconscious of its existence, and yet it is as essential to them as the need for food and water. Trolls thrive on a connection to certain forms of natural magic—complex metaphysical qualities found in particular locations that define the essence of a place. They are drawn inexorably to such places and often make their dwellings there, as close to the wellsprings of these magical qualities as possible. The individual “tastes” of trolls seem to vary by species or clan. For example, trolls of the Stone clan prefer places of great age and permanence, where the essence of a place has remained unchanged for hundreds or thousands of years. Trolls of the Root clan are compelled to seek out beginnings and places of creation, whereas those of the River clan seek points of change or transition, and so often make their homes beneath bridges or by the banks of rivers. 
Regarding the various varieties of trolls known to arcanozoologists, the word “clan” is the customary nomenclature, though it is widely acknowledged to be a misnomer. Most trolls are solitary creatures, and so the word “clan” would perhaps better be replaced with “species.” However, the term is derived from collective words in several of the trolls’ own languages (perhaps indicating a sense of brotherhood or unity among trolls of the same sort, or else referring to a time in ages forgotten where they did not lead such solitary lives). Therefore, by widespread and long use, it has become the generally-accepted term to refer to different species that fall under the umbrella term of “Troll.” Numerous troll clans are known to modern arcanozoologists, including Stone, Wind, Root, River, and Storm, with various legends and unconfirmed sightings hinting at the existence of many more.
Monster of the Week #16:
Troll, Stone Clan
Deeply and subconsciously in tune with natural magic like the rest of their kind, trolls of the Stone clan are drawn inexorably to places of great age and unchanging permanence. They make their homes in ancient mountains, forests, and even in the ruins of forgotten civilizations. While generally peaceful, Stone trolls will respond with awe-inspiring ferocity toward any foolish enough to try to alter their domains. 

I’ve been scribbling together a sort of personal mythology where trolls are concerned—I might make a separate post just dealing with these guys.

Monster of the Week #16:

Troll, Stone Clan

Deeply and subconsciously in tune with natural magic like the rest of their kind, trolls of the Stone clan are drawn inexorably to places of great age and unchanging permanence. They make their homes in ancient mountains, forests, and even in the ruins of forgotten civilizations. While generally peaceful, Stone trolls will respond with awe-inspiring ferocity toward any foolish enough to try to alter their domains. 
I’ve been scribbling together a sort of personal mythology where trolls are concerned—I might make a separate post just dealing with these guys.
Tidal Mudsnapper
Consumate ambush predators, mudsnappers use their long claws to burrow themselves to the tops of their heads in the soft mud of riverbanks. Their long tongues and lightning reflexes make short work of passing prey. 

We now return to our regularly-scheduled programming after my journey to IMC (post on that to come soon!) Suffice to say, it was a literally life-changing experience and I cannot say enough good things about it. It looks like I have a couple missed monsters to make up for in the meantime!

Tidal Mudsnapper


Consumate ambush predators, mudsnappers use their long claws to burrow themselves to the tops of their heads in the soft mud of riverbanks. Their long tongues and lightning reflexes make short work of passing prey. 

We now return to our regularly-scheduled programming after my journey to IMC (post on that to come soon!) Suffice to say, it was a literally life-changing experience and I cannot say enough good things about it. It looks like I have a couple missed monsters to make up for in the meantime!

thinkillustrationpaige replied to your post: Monster of the Week #14: OgreThe so-ca…

What media do you use to create the ogre

Hi there! Thanks for asking! The ogre was drawn in pencil on paper, then scanned into the computer. I took it into photoshop where I added the background texture, “washed” in some adjustments to the shadows, and added the opaque highlights.

Pretty much all of the Monsters of the Week are done this way—graphite (and sometimes ink wash) on paper, plus digital adjustments. I hope this answers your question, and that I wasn’t too rambly! :)

Monster of the Week #14: OgreThe so-called “least” of the giants, the mighty ogres make their homes in small settlements in the shadow of great mountains. While neither violent nor evil by nature, their unfortunate taste for human flesh makes interaction and study more perilous than beneficial.Gearing up for IMC next week (!!!) so I’m trying to get ahead.

Monster of the Week #14:

Ogre

The so-called “least” of the giants, the mighty ogres make their homes in small settlements in the shadow of great mountains. While neither violent nor evil by nature, their unfortunate taste for human flesh makes interaction and study more perilous than beneficial.


Gearing up for IMC next week (!!!) so I’m trying to get ahead.